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Adam Stein

PhD Candidate / Engineer / Consultant

Carnegie Mellon University

Biography

Adam Stein is a PhD Candidate in Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His current research interests include energy system design, emergency planning and decision making near nuclear power plants, and developing risk and consequence models for advanced reactors. He brings more than a decade of R&D experience to help address interdicipliary problems. Outside or engineering and research, he is the Partner & Family Advocate and VP of Campus Affairs for the Graduate Student Assembly at Carnegie Mellon University and Assistant Band Director for a local school district.

Interests

  • Energy System Modeling
  • Advanced Nuclear Risk and Safety
  • Decision Making Under Uncertainty
  • Product & Prototype Design
  • Mechatronics
  • Advanced manufacturing

Education

  • PhD Candidate in Engineering and Public Policy, 2020

    Carnegie Mellon University

  • MS in Engineering and Public Policy, 2019

    Carnegie Mellon University

  • MBA, 2016

    Indiana University of Pennsylvania

  • BS in Mechanical Engineering, 2009

    University of Pittsburgh

  • Certificate in Nuclear Engineering, 2009

    University of Pittsburgh

Recent Posts

Working Remotely - a How-to Guide

Successfully tansitioning to remote work needs to be well planned. Millions of people across many industries have suddenly been forced to switch to remote work due to the current COVID-19 situation, without much time to plan or resources. This guide offers suggestions and insight to ‘flatten the learning curve’ of how to work remotely by filling the gaps that other guides miss - no home office, a swift transition, family at home, and more. Everyone has unique circumstances that need to be addressed resulting in no perfect solution.

Working Remotely - Resources List

Working Remotely with a Partner or Family

Working at home with a family is a challenge even in the best of times. Most families can find some success working from home with enough effort and flexibility. The hope is that it will be a source of suggestions and insight to ‘flatten the learning curve’ of how to work remotely. This guide is an add-on to the Working Remotely How-to Guide, which should be read first.

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